5

The sentence is

Most things I’ve built and am proud of, are a result of this philosophy

Do we insert a comma after "of"? I want the sentence to be coherent.

5

No comma is necessary: "Most things I’ve built and am proud of are a result of this philosophy."

The main subject and verb of that complete sentence are "things are". Splitting those two words into different clauses with a single comma would make the entire sentence incorrect.

1

What you've got there is wrong - you could go one of three ways:

  1. Most things I’ve built and am proud of are a result of this philosophy

  2. Most things I’ve built, and am proud of, are a result of this philosophy

  3. Most things I’ve built - and am proud of - are a result of this philosophy

Can't give you a source for this, but just seems correct to me.

  • 1
    could you explain your reasoning ? – bholagabbar May 7 at 12:10
  • 1
    We will need more of a citation than "seems correct to me" I think... :-) – Rory Alsop May 7 at 14:37
  • The 2nd and 3rd make "am proud of" seem like a parenthetical comment, implying that you're always proud of the things you've built. – Barmar May 13 at 18:17
1

No.

Be proud of is a verb itself. Just like when you don't need a comma in "Most things I’ve built are a result of this philosophy"

You also can use substitute verbs like: pride(v), congratulate(v), plume(v)

further reads: two-word verbs comma usage

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