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What is the difference between "Are you sure to xxx?" and "Do you sure to xxx?"

I am writing an app that requires to ask the user to confirm some actions.

E.g. I want to confirm the user whether to delete a file, Should I use "Are you sure to delete this file?" or "Do you sure to delete this file?

I am not sure which one is better.

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    It needs more context to know what's the best sentence but "Do you sure to do..." isn't good English. – KillingTime May 7 at 5:09
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    The difference is that one is an unusual phrasing in English and the other is not English at all. Since we have no idea what context you’re wanting to use the phrase in, we can’t advise you on how to phrase it. – Janus Bahs Jacquet May 7 at 5:51
  • The question text has been updated. – The KNVB May 7 at 7:11
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    "Are you sure to delete this file?" does not mean what you intend. It means "Do you ensure that you delete this file every time you use it?". What you mean is "Are you sure you want to delete this file?" You could either use that, which is a bit long, use just "Are you sure?" or use "Confirm file deletion?". Whatever you do don't use "Do you sure to delete file" – BoldBen May 7 at 8:31
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What is the difference between "Are you sure to xxx?" and "Do you sure to xxx?"

Both don't really make much sense. "Do you sure to ..." is simply incorrect, whereas you can say "be sure to do something", meaning "don't forget to do it" (e.g. be sure to lock the door before you go to bed), yet this is also not how you would phrase things in the context of asking a user to confirm an action.

E.g. I want to confirm the user whether to delete a file, Should I use "Are you sure to delete this file?" or "Do you sure to delete this file?

What you want to ask is "Are you sure you want to xxx?". In your case this would be "Are you sure you want to delete this file?"

Edit: As @BoldBen points out, this phrase might be a little long. Something like "Are you sure?" or "Really delete file?" is probably better.

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