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Imagine this situation. A man finally achieves what he has been trying to achieve for long. When he gets the news, he is sitting in a restaurant. Elated, he asks the restaurant manager to serve all the customers whatever they want, and he will foot the bill for all. There is an expression to describe this free serving of food. It is something like, 'the house is...' Can anyone please suggest what is exactly that expression?

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When the restaurant pays for the drinks/food, it’s on the house:

(of a drink or meal in a bar or restaurant) at the management's expense; free.

The preposition on is used with whoever’s paying, so in this case you would say that the food is on him.

  • Yes, that's what I was looking for. Thanks a lot. This question may be closed now. – user343802 May 6 at 3:21
  • @user343802 If this is the answer you're looking for, you can accept it with the checkmark. – Laurel May 6 at 3:23
  • Ok. Did that. Being new here, I'm not fully aware of the modalities. Thanks! – user343802 May 6 at 3:26
  • In this case, however, it's not the management that's paying—it's the patron himself. I think the question is poorly formed because there isn't an answer that can satisfy both parts of it. – Jason Bassford May 6 at 5:07
  • @JasonBassford The last sentence of my post addresses this: the "him" refers to the man mentioned by OP. – Laurel May 6 at 5:08
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drinks on me or the drinks are on me wiktionary

Indicates that speaker is going to pay for the drinks [meals] consumed (at a bar, restaurant, etc.)

Similarly he could indicate to management "on me" pointing to the assembled crowd

  • Yes, that's what I was looking for. Thanks a lot. This question may be closed now. – user343802 May 6 at 3:21

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