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I'm editing an article, and a piece of dialogue is giving me some trouble.

You were practically a co-owner you’d been there so long.

Is this written correctly, or would a comma break up those two clauses? I.e.:

You were practically a co-owner, you’d been there so long.

Any help appreciated.

  • I would use a comma. (But it's not essential.) If you want a single phrase without a comma, then reverse the components: You were there so long that you were practically a co-owner. – Jason Bassford May 4 at 17:23
  • Or: You were practically a co-owner, as you’d been there so long. – TrevorD May 4 at 17:42
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    If you were to retain the current wording, the punctuation needs to change: the comma needs to be replaced by either a semi-colon or an n-dash. – TrevorD May 4 at 18:55

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