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I want to write "Hall thrusters are propulsion devices whose power spans from 0.1 to 20 kW."

I am not sure about "whose" part, because it feels like it's supposed to be used only when talking about humans (am I right?).

So is there any other word that could replace the "whose"? Or can it be used in this way and I am just overthinking it?

marked as duplicate by Janus Bahs Jacquet, FumbleFingers, Peter Shor , GEdgar, tchrist May 3 at 13:25

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    If you look up whose in any decent dictionary (e.g., ODO), you’ll see definitions and examples clearly include not only people, but also things; so yes, you’re over-thinking it. Whose is fine. – Janus Bahs Jacquet May 3 at 11:59
  • Ok, thanks. I looked it up here en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Who_(pronoun) and it said that it's mostly used when referring to humans, so I wasn't sure... But yeah, it looks like it's ok. – Andrej May 3 at 12:00
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    That’s because you looked up who, which is indeed limited to animate entities (mostly humans, sometimes animals) – but that’s a different word. Whose is not only the possessive form of who, but also of which. – Janus Bahs Jacquet May 3 at 12:07

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