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I'm trying to build an abstract skill level chart to be applied to diverse subjects.

Right now - using only common sense - the list of levels I was able to think is:

  • {MISSING} : Don't know anything about it nor have any skill on it.
  • Aware : Just know about it, but does not have any skill on it.
  • {MISSING} : Has some knowledge but no skill on it.
  • Practitioner : Has some knowledge and have a basic skill on it.
  • {MISSING} : Has good knowledge and good skill, but haven't master any technique.
  • Proficient : Has good knowledge and has skill enough to know one technique.
  • Expert : Has a very good knowledge and knows about more than one technique.
  • Master : Is a reference on the subject, very deep knowledge and dominates the subject.

As you can see, there is gaps on such skill levels.

Question : Is there any other words that can be placed - or replaced - to have more layers between these levels and encompass more of them on my list?

closed as too broad by TaliesinMerlin, Jeff Zeitlin, choster, Jason Bassford, Mari-Lou A Apr 30 at 8:02

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You could use "Novice", "Apprentice", and "Journeyman" in your list. For example:

  • Novice: Don't know anything about it nor have any skill on it.
  • Amateur : Just know about it, but does not have any skill on it.
  • Apprentice : Has some knowledge but no skill on it.
  • Journeyman : Has some knowledge and have a basic skill on it.
  • Practitioner: Has good knowledge and good skill, but haven't master any technique.
  • Proficient : Has good knowledge and has skill enough to know one technique.
  • Expert : Has a very good knowledge and knows about more than one technique.
  • Master : Is a reference on the subject, very deep knowledge and dominates the subject.
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    The problem with using "amateur" is that it's often used as a term to mean an non-professional and it's entirely possible for such non-professionals to be very skillful indeed. – KillingTime Apr 29 at 16:00
  • This is true. It can also be used as a noun defined as "A person who is contemptibly inept at a particular activity.", or as an adjective "Done in an inept or unskilful way." Both of these definitions come from the Oxford English Dictionary, and are the reasons I used it here. – Jeremy May 1 at 11:44
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I suggest you label your various levels more uniformly, whether as nouns or adjectives, as you did with your three highest levels, all of which are adjectives:

  • proficient worker
  • expert worker
  • master worker

As for some suggestions for your "missing" categories, here are some possibilities, all of which are nouns, except for those with modifying adjectives:

Level 1:

  • novitiate
  • apprentice
  • newbie
  • novice
  • initiate
  • trainee
  • rookie
  • neophyte
  • probie, or probationer

Level 2:

  • apprentice
  • learner
  • advanced beginner
  • semiskilled worker
  • amateur
  • competent worker

Level 3:

  • very competent worker
  • intermediate-ability worker
  • seasoned worker
  • accomplished worker
  • journeyman
  • tradesman
  • craftsman
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You might want to consider just using Level 0, Level 1, etc. as you have so many levels. The titles become fairly meaningless with this level of granularity.

Or use fewer levels. For example, one organisation I work for uses (something like) the following:

  • None: no experience or real understanding of the technology
  • Low: reasonable understanding of the technology, limited experience
  • Medium: good level of technical knowledge and experience
  • High: deep technical knowledge of the technology, applications and the market

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