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I am creating a scope of work and I can't seem to find the right term to say...

(including context)

Contractor should provide in wall conduit. If no in wall conduit is available, contractor should arrange "wall digging/wall etching" at their own expense.

Thanks

  • 1
    There's Home Improvement which could also help with this sort of question. – Andrew Leach Apr 21 at 7:58
  • 1
    Depends on whether you're the electrician or the wall repair guy. – Hot Licks Apr 21 at 12:24
  • If you said "chase" and I did it in 'raceway' (exposed, surface mount conduit - that's what comes up when you google 'electrical wire chase'), you'd be upset, and I'd say you should have been more specific. : "in wall (EMT conduit)" - 'no surface mount'. - I call it, surgery. – Mazura Apr 21 at 23:21
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It's called chasing. It took three goes to find this use in a dictionary to support this assertion.

  1. a : to ornament (metal) by indenting with a hammer and tools without a cutting edge

    b : to make by such indentation

    c : to set with gems

  2. a : groove, indent [q.v.]

    b : to cut (a thread) with a chaser

Merriam-Webster

Etymology from French enchâsser - to set (precious stone). It appears unconnected with chase meaning "to hunt etc", which is from the old French chacier later chascier by 11th century chaser. (OED) However a Northern French variant is written cacher, which is of course modern French for "to hide". One suspects there may be a connected root here. As we have noted before we are not authoritative on French etymologies.

  • Is there any other choices, I'm in the middle east and I have never seen that in any document in that context. I'm concern it will raise more ambiguity than clarity. – Wayne Apr 21 at 8:02
  • 4
    You could just say that the cable should be buried in the wall, but you did ask for the proper term. – Andrew Leach Apr 21 at 8:05
  • this seems to be an option.. Anyone else? – Wayne Apr 21 at 8:06
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    @Wayne "Channelling"? – user323578 Apr 21 at 8:09
  • This is a contract term, and this isn't law.se so the suitability of a term would depend on local jurisdiction and local industry practices. In common law systems if both you and the contractor understand each other, (meeting of the minds) then any word would suffice that is mutually intelligible, "chasing" is accurate enough that if questioned can be looked up in the dictionary. In a scope of work I would err on more explicit and verbose description of the work "Perform any necessary work, at contractors expense, to route a channel if existing conduit is not available" – crasic Apr 21 at 20:32
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In the UK it is called chasing:

When running cables or pipes up (or along) a masonry wall, the neatest method is to bury (or, in builders terms, chase) them in the wall surface.

(From a DIY site)

Although this meaning doesn't appear in dictionaries I have checked, it probably derives from:

chase2: Engrave (metal, or a design on metal)

Edit: Just noticed that Merriam-Webster has this definition, which is closer:

2a : GROOVE, INDENT

b : to cut (a thread) with a chaser

Oxford Dictionary

I have also heard "channelled" used in this context.

  • Hmm... well at least someone agrees with me. – Andrew Leach Apr 21 at 8:05
  • @AndrewLeach Sorry, Your reply wasn't visible when I read the question! – user323578 Apr 21 at 8:08
  • knowing now that chasing is a UK standard term for this, it seems to be the right choice. At least I have reference from UK that is widely honored here. – Wayne Apr 21 at 8:15
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This is a contract term, and this isn't law.se so the suitability of a term would depend on local jurisdiction and local industry practices and accepted jargon, which can be highly regional.

In common law systems if both you and the contractor understand each other, (meeting of the minds) then any word would suffice that is mutually intelligible, but this is not a universal concept. In that case I would simply ask the contractor what wording they would expect.

"Chasing" is accurate enough that if questioned can be looked up in the dictionary, but I agree with others that it is not a common industry jargon in the US, for this type of work, but may well be where you are.

In a scope of work, a type of contract, I would err on more explicit and verbose description of the work and not try to find a term unless one immediately comes to mind. The appropriate jargon will vary from one culture to another.

For example.

Arrange to perform any necessary work, at contractors expense, to route appropriate channels for new conduit, if an existing suitable conduit or channel is not available

I would consult a lawyer/paralegal or someone local who you trust that is familiar with what a typical Scope Of Work or if the contractor is above board and willing - ask them for help in the wording

  • +1 on example given. Thanks – Wayne Apr 22 at 12:28
0

Chasing is the correct word. However also be aware of the use of the word "channel" which can also be used to describe the cut-out section that a wire, pipe or conduit goes into.

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