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so I'm translating an RPG book from English to Brazilian Portuguese and stumbled upon (for the first time) with the expression "strident note". I'm not familiar with it, and although I can sort of grasp the overall idea of the excerpt where it appears, I wanted to have a better understanding of its meaning, but my attempts to google it returned no results with its meaning, just examples of usage.

Can anyone help me? Here's the excerpt:

"Ana's ultimate goal is to persuade her husband to use his authority to have the cigani identified as an undesirable pagan influence on [...]. Unfortunately, Father Filopovic is a more tolerant man than she had anticipated, and a strident note has entered her calls to eject the cigani."

closed as off-topic by Jim, Jason Bassford, tchrist Apr 20 at 19:02

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    This is just two words in a row, they should be looked up individually in a dictionary. – Jim Apr 20 at 18:54
  • they happen enough together to give me a feeling there's a figurative meaning that ppl unfamiliar with it wouldn't grasp, that's why I'm asking... – Jufajardini Apr 21 at 20:33
  • Ok, that makes sense, but after no definition for the collocation is found, then that concept can be dismissed and the individual words can be looked up. – Jim Apr 22 at 1:26
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A literal strident sound is one that is "loud, unpleasant, and rough"; figuratively the term can be used about something expressed in forceful language that does not try to avoid upsetting other people. Ana's efforts to have the cigani identified as a pagan influence (etc) were not as successful as she had hoped, so she used forceful, possibly impolite, language in calling for their ejection.

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/strident

  • thank you, I can understand and see that! – Jufajardini Apr 21 at 20:33

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