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If I am assigned a work and i know how to do it but I will say i do not know because I do not want to work.

closed as off-topic by Jason Bassford, JJJ, TrevorD, Cascabel, Chappo Apr 19 at 8:24

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  • 2
    Why would there be a psychological term? Isn't "liar" accurate enough? – user323578 Apr 17 at 12:04
  • Of course one must consider motivation -- how many people, when asked to clean a dirty bathroom, would claim that they didn't know how to do it? – Hot Licks Apr 17 at 12:04
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    (It's often called "shirking'.) – Hot Licks Apr 17 at 12:04
  • 1
    @HotLicks I was thinking "lazy bastard" – WendyG Apr 17 at 12:27
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    POB. One might call them "lazy", "liar", "irresponsible", "unconcerned", "happy-go-lucky", "unhelpful" but none of these are specific for "knows but doesn't want" – Centaurus Apr 17 at 13:44
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The (more general) term incongruence (incongruent person here) comes to mind. It is the opposite of congruence defined as 'matching of experience and awareness'.

https://study.com/academy/lesson/incongruence-in-psychology-definition-lesson-quiz.html

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If they choose to say they don't know how to do it, it's because they have no real escuse except that they are lazy and unconcerned. In such context I would use these two adjectives.

  • lazy Not willing to work or be energetic,

  • unconcerned (not involved : not having any part or interest) suggests a lack of sensitivity or regard for others' needs or troubles.

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I would say

"A work-shy person".

According to Cambridge Dictionary :

Work-shy

adjective

​ - disliking work and trying to avoid it when possible:

// Most of the unemployed are not work-shy and genuinely do want jobs.

One more word which can be appropriate here:

Malingerer

from the verb

to malinger

intransitive verb

: to pretend or exaggerate  incapacity or illness (as to avoid duty or work)

Or:

: to pretend to be ill or otherwise  incapacitated in order to escape duty or work; shirk

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