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For starters English is my third language so please excuse any grammar/voc errors. I am currently reading the book 'I am pilgrim' and I stumbled upon a weird sentence.

A small voice inside, a child's voice, kept telling me something I've never forgotten: I would have such as to have known her.

I googled the sentence multiple times but only found one site that does reviews of books where someone had the same problem. The link is at the bottom. Appearently it's a key sentence in the book and I interpreted it as: 'I would have liked to have known her'. I believe that's correct but in the link down below the author agrees with me and doesn't understand the sentence too.

Can anyone help me in how the original sentence is gramatically correct and maybe the rules behind it? Thanks in advance

http://clothesinbooks.blogspot.com/2013/07/i-am-pilgrim-by-terry-hayes.html

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  • It's unclear to me what you mean by redaction error. How are you using the term redaction?
    – Lawrence
    Apr 13, 2019 at 12:46
  • This seems nonsense now. Unless "such" refers to something in the previous sentence, which is not given.
    – GEdgar
    Apr 13, 2019 at 13:15
  • @Lawrence Redaction as in editing text for publication. Maybe they deleted a word on accident? I know it's a long shot but idk what else to think of that sentence. Apr 13, 2019 at 13:30
  • @GEdgar I agree. Here's the previous sentence for context: 'I stared at it, both uplifted and devastated by the stark image of a familiy and a mother's endless love. A small voice...' Apr 13, 2019 at 13:37

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It's a typo. Here's an extract from a published version:

A small voice inside, a child's voice, kept telling me something I've never forgotten: I would have liked to have known her. - I Am Pilgrim

The word "liked" in that version corresponds to the word "such" in your version.

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