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I gave a script I wrote to a professional proofreader, and one correction she gave me, I just can't understand (and she doesn't seem to agree with me).

This is complete original sentence:

So far in this course, we talked about doing everything the right way, but even if you’re not doing it right, remember the most deciding factor as to where professionally you’ll be in 1-2-3 years from now is your rate of improvement.

And here is her suggestion for changing the second part of my sentence:

... remember the most deciding factor as to where professionally you’ll be in 1-2-3 years from now, which is how you would rate your improvement.

Do those two sentences have the same meaning?
I think not, because they use different meanings of the word "rate" - the first is "the speed at which something happens or changes", and the second: "to judge the value or character of someone or something".

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    I don't understand what your original sentence means. Is it the complete sentence (you haven't capitalised remember)? Maybe it will be clearer if you include the sentence before and after it.
    – Shoe
    Commented Apr 8, 2019 at 11:47
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    Is there a typo in the second version? I don't see "years", which is correct in the first version. Neither version is particularly good though.
    – Mari-Lou A
    Commented Apr 8, 2019 at 11:59
  • You at least need to include the entire sentence, and possibly more context besides, but on the face of it the two mean distinctly different things.
    – Hot Licks
    Commented Apr 8, 2019 at 12:16
  • Yup, the two instances of rate mean different things.
    – Lawrence
    Commented Apr 8, 2019 at 14:00
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    Ok, now we have the whole sentence the meaning is clear and the proofreader's version is wrong. However, you need either a comma or a colon after remember.
    – Shoe
    Commented Apr 8, 2019 at 15:55

1 Answer 1

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You should find a different proofreader because this one is not very good at their job. I don't think I can really add anything to what you've said yourself:

because they use different meanings of the word "rate" - the first is "the speed at which something happens or changes", and the second: "to judge the value or character of someone or something".

You're entirely correct, the two sentences use different senses of the word rate and as a result they have distinctly different meanings.

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