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I'm looking for a verb to describe the "Y" thing the water makes when it hits a rock, for example in the river. Here is a professional piece of art I made (view from the top): enter image description here

Is it simply called "going around"? Or there's/re another word/s for it?

Here's the sentence example: "He stood in the middle of the shallow river, the water _____ him."

  • Please can you supply an example sentence you would use the word in? – Matt E. Эллен Apr 4 at 10:20
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    If you want technical language, as your picture suggests maybe you do, you could try Physics. – aparente001 Apr 5 at 3:17
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If flowed is unacceptable then how about "curved around", or even "slid past/by". For a bit of color, "rushed by".

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The "Y" shape of the water is caused by the water "splitting" around the obstacle. Another word would be "bifurcate" which means splitting into two paths (such as bifurcation of the water flow), but that may be too technical sounding. If that is the case, the path of the water is certainly "parting". Or, less directly, one could simply state that the stream "surrounded" him (diverging around him naturally - thus splitting is implied).

"He stood in the middle of the shallow river, the water splitting around him."

"He stood in the middle of the shallow river, the water bifurcating around him."

"He stood in the middle of the shallow river, the water parting about him."

https://www.thefreedictionary.com/split

https://www.thefreedictionary.com/bifurcate

https://www.thefreedictionary.com/part

https://www.thefreedictionary.com/surround

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I would say "the water rippled past the rock".

enter image description here enter image description here

  • please elaborate – JJJ Apr 4 at 23:25
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To bend:

"(Of a road, river, or path)

deviate from a straight line in a specified direction." (https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/bend)

Here's an example from Reverso.context.net:

It's like water bending around a rock in a stream, and all that light just destroys the shadow.

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