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I mean, what verb should/can "call" be replaced with to obtain the opposite?

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    What do you mean by the "opposite"? If you can't describe it, we can't find a word for it. Apr 3 '19 at 18:42
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    Do you mean "fold?"
    – jejorda2
    Apr 3 '19 at 19:48
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    In what sense? Capitulate? Stand firm? Gamble on being right? Apr 3 '19 at 19:59
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    You need to explain how the "opposite" works in social interaction. What do you mean by the "opposite"? Examples of calling someone's bluff and doing the opposite would definitely help, since you're not talking about card games (and that information should be edited into the question, too).
    – Andrew Leach
    Apr 3 '19 at 21:58
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    When the question has been clarified so it can be answered, it can be taken off-hold.
    – Andrew Leach
    Apr 3 '19 at 21:59
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I would go with ‘buy someone’s bluff’ or ‘fall for someone’s bluff’.

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  • Can you elaborate how this answers the OP? (I think this is on the right track, but we like some detail/justification why you think it applies in this case.)
    – Mitch
    Apr 3 '19 at 22:01
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In the spirit of the card game comment by @jejorda2, I’d say they is no opposite.

Calling their bluff is just one of three options.

In poker, when someone bets (and they may or may have been bluffing) you have more than two options. They are -

  • call - call someone’s bluff, you don’t really believe their “story” but are a little bit scared it could still be true
  • fold - give in and fall for their bluff
  • raise - increase the stakes, potentially going “all in” because you’re not scared

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