2

In Oxford Dictionary, under 'alight', it says:

  1. on fire

•A cigarette set the dry grass alight.

  1. (formal) (of faces or eyes) showing a feeling of happiness or excitement

•The children’s faces were alight with enthusiasm.

.................................................

What does "alight on his feet" mean in this sentence?

It's a relieve that the soccer player was alight on his feet.

  • 6
    There are several errors. "It's a relief that the soccer player was light on his feet." reads correctly. Light on his feet would mean he is agile and quick. – W.E. Mar 30 '19 at 16:16
  • or still upright on his feet – lbf Mar 30 '19 at 16:22
  • Oh, thank you! .......... – Ruby Mar 30 '19 at 16:23
0

There are several other answers that are misunderstanding the meaning of OP's sentence.

As I stated in my comment, there are two errors here. Alight is not correct. Alight has a totally different meaning. Relieve is not correct. Correcting the sentence results in:

"It's a relief that the soccer player was light on his feet."

Even this sounds a little awkward to me.

Light-footed is an adjective meaning "moving gracefully and nimbly", per Merriam-Webster. A clear, concise rewriting of the sentence results in:

"It's a relief the soccer player is light-footed."

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.