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When people say "XXX is one of my favourite restaurants", what do they want to express? Why they don't just say "I like XXX"?

  • There are 30 restaurants that I like out of about 50 in town. So saying "I like X" is faint praise. But of those 30 there are 5 that are my favorites. Of course if there are only 5 restaurants in town the math is different. – Hot Licks Mar 30 at 12:01
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You usually use the phrase 'one of my' when you have multiple favorites.

For example:

Assume I like 3 restaurants namely: Restaurant A, Restaurant B, Restaurant C.

Now, I can say that Restaurant B is one of my favorite restaurants.

This means that I definitely like restaurant B, but there are other restaurants apart from Restaurant B that I like.

And when I say 'I like Restaurant A', it can mean that I like Restaurant A and here I'm not taking about any other Restaurant.

I hope this helps!

  • I think you may have mistyped your final sentence. I think it should be, "And when I say 'Restaurant A is my favourite', it means that I like Restaurant A more than any other restaurant. – chasly from UK Mar 30 at 9:26
  • Hey, @chasly. Thanks for pointing it out. But I was careful in not using the word favorite in the last final sentence. When I say 'I like Restaurant A', does it also mean that I like Restaurant A more than any other Restaurant? – zeeman Mar 30 at 9:29
  • No, it just means you like it, but it doesn't say anything about other restaurants. For example you could say, "I like restaurant A but I like restaurant B even more." or "I like restaurant A but B is my favourite." – chasly from UK Mar 30 at 9:34
  • Thanks. I edited my answer – zeeman Mar 30 at 9:38
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When people say "XXX is one of my favourite restaurants", what do they want to express? Why they don't just say "I like XXX"?

Here is an example:

  • My favourite restaurant in Paris is AAAA. My favourite restaurant in London is BBBB. My favourite restaurant in New York is CCCC.

  • So you have three favourite restaurants?

  • Yes I do and BBBB is one of them.

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