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I have told her what to watch out for, and should she develop any worrying features in the future, please do not hesitate to contact me.

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This sentence contains one independent clause joined by a conjunction to a second independent clause that's preceded by a dependent clause.

This can be seen by turning it into two separate sentences:

I have told her what to watch out for.

This is an independent clause.

And:

Should she develop any worrying features in the future, please do not hesitate to contact me.

This is an independent clause that's preceded by a dependent clause. The comma is used here after the dependent clause.


They can be written as separate sentences. If joined into a single sentence, a semicolon can be used to separate them or a comma followed by a conjunction.

So, these are all correct:

I have told her what to watch out for. Should she develop any worrying features in the future, please do not hesitate to contact me.

I have told her what to watch out for; should she develop any worrying features in the future, please do not hesitate to contact me.

I have told her what to watch out for, and should she develop any worrying features in the future, please do not hesitate to contact me.


Each of the commas in the sentence serves a useful (but different) purpose.

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This is a "parenthetical element"

The parenthetical element (also known as an aside) is part of the sentence that can be removed without changing the essential meaning of the sentence.

University of Bristol

Technically there is nothing wrong with putting a comma infront of an "and".

It's used when linking two indipendent clauses:

Example: "I went running, and I saw a duck."

Buisness Insider

The problem here is that the sentence doesn't funktion without the inside.

I have told her what to watch out for please do not hesitate to contact me

I've modified the sentence slightly:

I have told her what to watch out for and, should she develop any worrying features in the future, to please not hesitate to contact me.

The "to please not hesitate to contact me." is far from an elegant solution but I didn't come up with anything better.

Again, nothing wrong with having a comma in front of an "and", it just didn't work out in this case.

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