0

"Where is the key with which I usually use to unlock the drawer in the office?"

Is the sentence above grammatically correct? I saw it in a test a few days ago...

  • No, this is ungrammatical. You use the key to unlock the drawer. You don't use with the key to unlock the drawer. – RegDwigнt Mar 26 at 11:18
  • I see, so the correct sentence should be "Where is the key I usually use to unlock the drawer in the office?" without with which huh. Thank you for the help! – caramerro Mar 26 at 11:28
  • "Where is the key with which I usually unlock the drawer in the office?" is also correct. – Davo Mar 26 at 12:12
  • You can use "which" by itself as well, without the preceding "with" – Tim Foster Mar 26 at 12:23
  • Yes, you can either just drop the "with which" as you did, or alternatively you can drop the "use". "The key with which I unlock" or "the key I use to unlock", just not a mix of both. This is a test for attention more so than for grammar, I can imagine many readers reading right past it, or noticing it but dismissing it as a mere typo. – RegDwigнt Mar 26 at 12:29
1

"Where is the key with which I usually use to unlock the drawer in the office?"

Grammatically this sentence is not correct but we can use it as an informal.

The correct sentence is:

"Where is the key which I usually use to unlock the drawer in the office?"

  • 1
    Or "Where is the key with which I usually unlock the drawer ...?" – TrevorD Mar 26 at 14:35

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.