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Please explain to me the meaning of the following sentence:

I hope such readers will be persuaded that the profundity and value of these ideas more than repay the intellectual struggle they require [...].

closed as off-topic by TrevorD, kiamlaluno, Janus Bahs Jacquet, Glorfindel, Hellion Mar 24 at 20:49

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  • Please provide more context and/or a link to the quoted sentence. Specifically, ""such readers" clearly refers back to something mentioned previously, and we cannot interpret that without the earlier context. And there is more text missing at the end "... they require [in order to do what?] – TrevorD Mar 24 at 18:11
  • Furthermore, to add to what @TrevorD said, you should make clear what you don't understand in that sentence. – kiamlaluno Mar 24 at 18:15
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I hope such readers will be persuaded 
  that 
  the profundity and value of these ideas more than repay
   the intellectual struggle they require 

I hope such readers will reach the opinion that the deep significance and value of these ideas do reward the arduous mental effort they demand (of the reader).

  • I don't see how formatting the sentence like that explains it's meaning, please clarify. – JJJ Mar 24 at 19:18
  • Since you didn't say what was giving you trouble, I broke it up into meaningful chunks in case you were thinking that an intellectual was being repaid, or some other misparsing. Did you read the sentence below? – user341383 Mar 24 at 19:36
  • I see, maybe it would be clearer if broke the second sentence up in a similar fashion? I hadn't realised you interchanged some of the words to make it easier to understand. ;) – JJJ Mar 24 at 19:40
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Here's how I'd rewrite that sentence into simpler sentences:

I hope you've been persuaded that these ideas are worth learning. They require a good amount of intellectual struggle – you might have to think a lot to understand them. However, they are profound and valuable enough to outweigh that intellectual struggle.

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    This a good paraphrase. I'd consider letting the parenthetical statement stand as a sentence on par with the others. For example: "You may indeed have to think a lot to understand them." My rationale for that is that although you've simplified the original you've also introduced a complexity that wasn't there at first―the abbreviated Latin phrase id est, which may be unfamiliar, or less straightforward, to some readers. – Trevor Reid Mar 25 at 23:44

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