1

I heard a person saying, “That place is not any more riskier than this place”. (And it wasn’t about time- like how it has changed from earlier to now) I thought it’s grammatically incorrect to say so.

Anymore can refer to any longer as in “I was doing it but I am not doing it anymore”, or it can be any more with a space like “some more” as in “I have already eaten so much. I do not need any more of it”

But in the context I mentioned earlier it is not about time.

And riskier is already a comparitive and adding more before that makes it incorrect.

This is what I feel but I am looking for an expert answer to know if I am right and if yes, I am looking for a solid explanation as to why it is incorrect.

  • 1
    (a) the string not any more riskier than is ungrammatical. It should be either not any more risky than or not any riskier than, but not both. (b) never mind the any more; it's a negative polarity item, but as you point out the problem doesn't have to do with negation particularly. – John Lawler Mar 20 at 18:48
  • Beyond the correctness matter of double comparatives being forbidden in English, a simpler way to say it is that that place is no riskier than this one. – tchrist Mar 22 at 6:18
  • This is indeed ungrammatical, but don’t think that means you won’t hear native speakers say it. They’ll probably not write it, but double comparatives are fairly common in impromptu speech. I have a colleague at work (a native speaker) who for some reason is always getting nouns and adjectives mixed up after so, so she says things like, “That’s so much strange!” instead of “That’s so strange!”. Completely ungrammatical, but high-frequent from her… – Janus Bahs Jacquet Apr 21 at 14:16
0

John Lawler wrote in a comment:

(a) the string not any more riskier than is ungrammatical. It should be either not any more risky than or not any riskier than, but not both. (b) never mind the any more; it's a negative polarity item, but as you point out the problem doesn't have to do with negation particularly.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.