2

I've noticed that use, and I like to learn more about the theory behind it. In that sense, why to choose this tense over the Simple Present.

For example:

When you are walking around Denver and you're thinking, well, this is a nice area, this is really such a vital city...

Similarly, if a word is ending in z, it will likely need to be changed to c in order to smooth the pronunciation as in...

  • Using or not using the progressive construction is determined by the context of the story that's being told. These aren't even complete sentences; there's no context at all. How can anyone generalize about the appropriate use of random sentence fragments? – John Lawler Mar 16 at 20:29
  • 3
    Here is another example, this time, in the passive voice: "Using or not using the progressive construction is determined by the context of the story that's being told." – SunnySideDown Mar 16 at 20:31
1

You use the progressive when you think about the situation as having a beginning and an end. For example, one person might say, "I live in Toronto" because they don't think about every leaving Toronto. Another person, pehaps an international student studying at the UofT might say "I'm living in Toronto" because the person intends to leave after graduating. Again, it's not about the facts of the situation, since all situations have beginnings and ends. The speaker uses the progressive to tell the listener how the speaker is thinking about the situation.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.