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Can someone explain how the 'joining' part in this sentence is formed? and what can be the original sentence before reduction?

Joining us here in the studio to start things off we have expert Sonia Tarrington, from the University of California's Nutrition Research Centre.

I suppose the ing form at the beginning of the sentence cannot be considered a reduced adverb clause because the subjects cannot be the same. Then I thought it might be a reduced adjective clause which relocated to the beginning of the sentence? Something like this maybe? But is it possible at all to relocate adj. clauses?

We have expert Sonia Tarrington, from the University of California's Nutrition Research Centre, who has joined us here in the studio to start things off.

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    There's no 'reduction'. The gerund-participial clause has been preposed to a position before the subject. The basic version would be: We have expert Sonia Tarrington from the University of California's Nutrition Research Centre [joining us here in the studio to start things off]. Semantically, it's the equivalent of the relative clause "who joins us". – BillJ Mar 16 at 11:00
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    In BillJ's theory there is no reduction; in other theories there is. It's not a fact, it's an analytic tool. The relation between the sentences with preposed and final participial phrases is independent from the relation between the participial phrase and the relative clause in any event. – John Lawler Mar 16 at 16:08
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In a comment, BillJ wrote:

There's no 'reduction'. The gerund-participial clause has been preposed to a position before the subject. The basic version would be: We have expert Sonia Tarrington from the University of California's Nutrition Research Centre [joining us here in the studio to start things off]. Semantically, it's the equivalent of the relative clause "who joins us".

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In a comment, John Lawler wrote:

In BillJ's theory there is no reduction; in other theories there is. It's not a fact, it's an analytic tool. The relation between the sentences with preposed and final participial phrases is independent from the relation between the participial phrase and the relative clause in any event.

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