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I'm torn how to position the two instances of "it" in this question. I believe that both sentences are acceptable and convey the same meaning, but I'm not sure which is more likely to be confusing, ambiguous, or mis-understood.

Does one stand out as the better title for a Stack Exchange question? Is there a standard rule at play here that I should know about?

A: Is honey really a supersaturated solution? Does heating to un-crystalize redissolve it or melt it?

B: Is honey really a supersaturated solution? Does heating to un-crystalize it redissolve or melt it?

I suppose I could also get rid of one instance all together as well:

C: Is honey really a supersaturated solution? Does heating to un-crystalize redissolve or melt it?

  • I may need some help with proper tagging. – uhoh Mar 16 at 9:14
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    I find all three options perfectly clear and natural, with a slight preference for B. In natural conversation, I think I’d probably use it three times: “Does heating to decrystallise it redissolve it or melt it?”. (Note the double L and the prefix in decrystallise – I’ve never heard of un-crystallising honey, but decrystallising honey is a reasonably common phrase.) – Janus Bahs Jacquet Mar 16 at 9:40
  • @JanusBahsJacquet thanks for the reassurance, and for a new word for me; decrystallise – uhoh Mar 16 at 9:47
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    @JanusBahsJacquet I might even use four instances of the pronoun: Does heating it to un-crystalize it redissolve it or melt it? – Jason Bassford Mar 16 at 14:56

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