-1

In this article https://aeon.co/ideas/tidying-up-is-not-joyful-but-another-misuse-of-eastern-ideas

what does this sentence mean? "Which, to be clear, they are. Poor old Confucius features in these memes as a mystical oriental kitten, telling us all to hang in there!

3
  • 1
    books.google.com/books/content/images/frontcover/… This is a common poster theme. "Hang in there" is an idiom that means "Don't give up."
    – remarkl
    Mar 13, 2019 at 11:35
  • I need an explanation for the whole sentence please Mar 13, 2019 at 11:37
  • The sentence, aside from the idiom, is straightfoward English. If you understood the paragraph, you should be able to understand the final sentences. People today cite Confucius in support of "mini-homilies" - very short sermons - exhorting us to make sound choices, like tidying up or persevering against adversity ("Hang in there.").
    – remarkl
    Mar 13, 2019 at 11:52

1 Answer 1

1

Carefully checking the context of the paragraph-

"Which, to be clear, they are." refers to the statement "we might believe them to be yet more dull mini-homilies". "they" and "them" refer to the list of things in the paragraph that are supposed to have been said by Confucius.

"Poor old Confucius features in these memes as a mystical oriental kitten, telling us all to hang in there!" refers to a specific inspirational poster that portrays a dangling cat and the phrase "Hang in there"

The author is complaining about the misuse of the East Asian philosophies in popular culture and the kitten poster is used as an example.

1
  • Is the "Hang in There" kitten Asian? I had no idea. That poster dates back to the 1970s at least.
    – shoover
    Mar 13, 2019 at 18:25

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.