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which sentence do you prefer?

Alex invited the new visitors inside the house and led them to his parents’ office.

Alex invited the new visitors into the house and led them to his parents’ office.

closed as off-topic by Lambie, Mark Beadles, Jason Bassford, jimm101, TrevorD Mar 12 at 0:30

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  • Are you asking for a preference or whether one or the other is ungrammatical? If so, which one do you think is correct? – Mark Beadles Mar 11 at 16:24
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Neither is idiomatic. The "the house" is superfluous. A native speaker would say "Alex invited the new visitors in and ...", or "Alex invited the new visitors inside and ..."

Usually "invited ... in" is sufficient. "Invited inside" is used more commonly when there is something undesirable about the outside, like the weather. Thus:

Alex invited the new visitors in and led them to his parents' office

but

Alex invited the new visitors inside and put their umbrellas in the stand.
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    Don't disagree with your alternatives, but "into the house" seems idiomatic, to me. But it may be unnecessary unless you need to be specific about them being invited into the house as opposed to the shop or garage. – user323578 Mar 11 at 14:57
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    @JamesRandom I agree that it is idiomatic in the right context. – remarkl Mar 11 at 14:59