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If I have to ask someone that "is it clear" then what word should I use?

closed as unclear what you're asking by Pam, J. Taylor, Hot Licks, TrevorD, Attack Helicopter Mar 12 at 16:18

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    In one word? I think you can just say "clear?". I usually say that while playing online games, specially FPS ones, to ask a teammate if a room or an area has been cleared. – Renan Mar 11 at 13:29
  • Do you know some other words that looks very nice and modern – Cayden Mar 11 at 13:34
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    Is what clear? Clear has several meanings. Your question is not clear. – TRomano Mar 11 at 13:35
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    Do you mean "is it clear" in the sense of "have you understood"? If so, what is wrong with "is it clear"? Or do you mean clear in the sense of "transparent"? If so, what is wrong with "is it clear"? – user323578 Mar 11 at 15:02
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    Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. – Hot Licks Mar 11 at 17:14
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People often use the word "See" - asked as a question. In the sense of that usage, it means the same thing. "See?". You can also use the word "understand?" in the same way.

https://www.thefreedictionary.com/see

https://www.thefreedictionary.com/understand

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It's not unusual for English speakers to use the Spanish loanword "Comprende?" for this purpose.

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Or the Italian "Capiche?" (or however that is spelled)

Or the simpler "Okay?"

Or perhaps "Got it?"

Or "You with me?"

  • It is "capisci," but often pronounced without the final "i" in parts of the US with Italian American communities I believe. Not really standard English though. – Tim Foster Mar 11 at 17:02
  • It's “capisci” (second person singular) or “capisce” (third person singular used as a respect form). In dialects of Southern Italy, the final vowel of the first form can end up being a schwa, rather than omitted; those dialects use the second person plural for the respect form, so “capite”. – egreg Apr 14 at 21:40

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