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The above-mentioned idiom comes from my native language. We use it when we are referring to a person ( often tasteless and unsophisticated one ) who finds it hard to appreciate a good thing or does not understand the ( aesthetic ) value of something. More or less similar expression in English I have found is this - "Caviar to the general" but it does not fully convey the same meaning. Is there an idiom or expression in English which would carry the same meaning ?

Yesterday we were talking about food and do you know what John said ? He said that he preferred fast food restaurants over expensive ones. Well, A donkey does not know what kind of fruit persimmon is.

4

Try "pearls before the swine"

https://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/pearls-before-swine.html

Items of quality offered to those who aren't cultured enough to appreciate them.

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2

You could use

wouldn't know (something) if it hit (one) in the face: Is too oblivious or ignorant to realize or recognize a very obvious thing. You're no expert. You wouldn't know a Rembrandt if it hit you in the face. Tim's not much of a scout. He wouldn't know promising talent if it hit him in the face.

He wouldn't know good food if it hit him in the face.

But your original, translated literally to English, is so much better (the persimmon is my favorite fruit). I suggest sticking with that.

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1

He is a philistine -

OED:

  1. In extended use (now usually philistine). An uneducated or unenlightened person; one perceived to be indifferent or hostile to art or culture, or whose interests and tastes are commonplace or material; a person who is not a connoisseur.

1977 Times 8 Feb. 17/1 The philistines would be foolish to regard aid for the arts merely as a perk provided by all for the esoteric pursuits of the few.

2000 Sunday Times (Johannesburg) (Electronic ed.) 2 Jan. French chefs were imported [to Johannesburg] to lavish their talents on the culinary Philistines of the very young city.

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0

There is the idiom/proverb "There's no accounting for taste". It can be overused, but it is still appropriately useful when bad taste rears its ugly head.

Yesterday we were talking about food and do you know what John said ? He said that he preferred fast food restaurants over expensive ones. Well, There's no accounting for taste.

https://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/there%27s+no+accounting+for+taste

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