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"The PM is seeking legally binding changes to the backstop - the plan to avoid the return of Irish border checks should no EU-UK trade deal be in place." I don't understand the grammatical structure.

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The first line is the Prime Ministers aim: this is to make changes to the backstop agreement.

Most of the sentence is a definition of the backstop-.
So, the backstop is the plan to avoid XXXX if there is no EU-UK trade deal.

She wants to change the backstop- which is the plan to avoid the return of Irish border checks should no EU-UK trade deal be in place.

When "if" is removed from a conditional clause, there is inversion.

Read as: "...the plan, if no EU-UK trade deal should be in place"

In very formal English 'were to,' 'should,' and 'might' are still used:

Read as: "...the plan, if no EU-UK trade deal is in place".

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    I completed the whole question. Can you complete your answer, please? I'm still a little confused. – Ace Ace Feb 26 at 7:28

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