0

The context of the phrase:

Participants are not allowed to come late. In such case they just don’t come. When you arrive, you will find the next meeting is next Friday (which datum it might announce on the notice board or something like that).

I assume that the definition of it in this phrase means

Used as the subject of an impersonal verb

And the meaning of the phrase then becomes: “which datum might be announced on the notice board.”

Is it an irregular/spoken use or does it appear in literature?

  • 1
    It’s impossible to tell from only a fragment of a sentence. Please edit the question to include more context – at least the whole sentence, and preferably the whole paragraph. It announce is not an impersonal verb, so the meaning you cite here does not apply; the most obvious interpretation would be that ‘it’ refers to something like a computer system (if the notice board is electronic) – but more context is necessary to say for sure. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Feb 25 at 4:13
  • Was that written by a native speaker? It does seem that the meaning is intended to be “which date may be announced on the notice board or similar”, but the whole paragraph is extremely poorly written and makes little sense, and the sentence you highlight is completely ungrammatical to me. “In such case” is also ungrammatical (it should be “in such cases” or “in such a case” or “in that case”). If this was written by a native speaker, it's definitely someone with very poor writing and communication skills. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Feb 25 at 5:01
  • 1
    Do you have a link to the speech? You may be mishearing something, or pauses and repeats may be tricking you. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Feb 25 at 5:10
  • Sorry, no, I don't have. But it is clearly says what is transcribed. I assume that this is simply just a spoken way of speaking, not fully thought through (not done from a prewritten speech). – ib11 Feb 25 at 5:22
  • 1
    What is the antecedent of it in "it might announce"? My guess is that it appears in a sentence you have not included in the context. – TRomano Feb 25 at 13:40
1

... which piece of information it might announce on the notice board...

The antecedent to it is probably to be found in the sentence before the first one you quoted.

For example:

This is an exclusive luncheon gathering with very strict rules respecting punctuality. Participants are not allowed to come late. In such case they just don’t come. When you arrive, you will find the next meeting is next Friday (which datum it might announce on the notice board or something like that).

luncheon gathering <- it

The pronoun it most likely refers to the entity running the meeting, or to the meeting itself qua entity.

0

"datum" is the singular form of the word "data" You are correct in that it is rarely used in everyday speech. We tend to use "data" for both.

Apparently it is also an engineering term to represent a starting point (or point of reference...i think?) on an axis...? (don't quote me on that last piece of information please- no time to check myself and language is my forte, not mathematics I'm afraid!

  • ...and I agree that this is a really REALLY poorly-written piece!! ^ – Kat xoxo Feb 25 at 5:54
  • Thank you for answering. This is not written, please see above. It is an informal talk. This was not clear in my question. But it is better not to write opinions, which are of critical nature. See english.stackexchange.com/conduct No real issue however but luckily if you want you can easily delete your own comment. – ib11 Feb 25 at 19:05

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.