1

1

John: Does the fax machine be used any more ?

Mary: Yes, it does be used on occasion.

2

John: Is the fax machine used any more?

Mary: Yes, it is used on occasion.

.

Are these different tenses ?

Can anyone explain these two structures in detail ?

  • 3
    'Does be used' is not an expression that would ever be found in standard English. Your second version is the only correct one. – Kate Bunting Feb 23 at 8:26
  • 1
    ... though you might say “Does the fax machine get used any more”. – pbasdf Feb 23 at 8:48
  • @KateBunting The ''does be'' structure expresses habitualness and does still be used in many places. I guess it is becoming enveloped by the present simple. i.e. I do be cold. (I am habitually cold) is different to: I am cold. (I am cold now) – Kantura Feb 23 at 8:51
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    @Derek It’s not used in “many places” – just in Ireland. Outside Ireland, it is completely unknown. It’s really just a transplant of Irish bíonn (as opposed to ), a distinction which does not exist in English indigenously and so was created by the Irish. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Feb 23 at 10:07
1

Replace "be" with "get" in the first dialog.

John: Does the fax machine be used any more ? Incorrect: Use get vs. be.

Mary: Yes, it does be used on occasion. Incorrect: Use get vs. be.

2 //Note: helping verbs (do/does/did) of standard English may be problematic if you are used to speaking another language or dialect//

John: Is the fax machine used any more? Correct: Alt: Does vs. Is; insert "get" btwn machine and used

Alt: John: Does the fax machine get used anymore?

Mary: Yes, it is used on occasion. Correct:
Alt does get vs is

Alt: Mary: Yes, it does get used on occasion.

An excellent website for English as Second Language for this topic is here: https://www.learn-english-today.com/lessons/lesson_contents/verbs/to-be-used-to.html

  • 1
    This has nothing to do with ESL or with get. Does be is a valid construction in English, just one that’s limited to a particular group of dialects, namely Irish English. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Feb 23 at 10:09
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    Shall I provide my reply in Creole English next time, or in Medieval English? How far off the Standard English path can we stray here? My answers stand as is. – Steve B053 Feb 23 at 10:30
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    Irish English is neither a creole nor a historical form of English. It is no less standard than AmE, BrE, AuE, NZE, etc. Would you have suggested an ESL resource if someone had asked about a specific British construction, or a specifically Australian one? We have many questions here about dialectal peculiarities specific to single dialect areas of the US; this is no difference. To answer your question: as far as we wish. This site is not intended to stick narrowly to any kind of prescriptively ‘standard’ English. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Feb 23 at 10:37
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    For brevity sake, I'll make no further comment: Observation: Before making any post, I check the poster's profile. There's nothing that would indicate who they are here, This site: The gamut--from a person from India just learning English to a tenured professor of English, and everything beyond or between--in a blank user profile. Next time, I'll skip them. – Steve B053 Feb 23 at 11:21

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