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I have a question based upon the information below:

1) today's date: 21 Feb
2) Jane (someone in some office) takes leave from 1 Feb to 31 Mar (2 months)

My question:

If someone is looking for Jane in the office, can I say something like:

A) Jane is taking leave for 2 months and she will only be back to work on 1st of Apr (Monday)
B) Jane is currently on leave and she will only be back to work on 1st of Apr (Monday)
C) Jane has taken leave since 1st of Feb and she will only be back to work on 1st of Apr (Monday)
D) Jane took leave for 2 months and she will only be back to work on 1st of Apr (Monday)

Can any English teacher please explain which reply is correct and which reply is wrong?

Many thanks.

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Sentence D is the only sentence that is problematic since the use of the past simple implies that the period of leave is now over.

Sentence B is in my opinion the most natural way of conveying your meaning, but I would change the second clause as follows:

Jane is currently on leave and (she) will not be back at work until Monday 1 April.

  • Thanks for your explaination. In sentence A, would it imply that the Jane's leave is not yet started? How would actually a natural english speaker say with 'take leave' (instead of on leave) to convey the same message? Many thanks again. – superdan Feb 22 at 2:23
  • @superdan. The problem is that "taking leave" can mean both 1.) "currently on leave"as in your sentences, and 2.) "going on leave". For example, I'm taking leave at the beginning of next month so I will be on leave the next time you call in at the office. In the context you state then "is taking leave" will no doubt be interpreted as "currently on leave". As a native British English speaker and English teacher I use taking leave to mean going on/starting leave and on leave for the current state. But other native speakers may use the phrases differently. – Shoe Feb 22 at 8:06
  • You have cleared much of my doubt. Thank you so much. – superdan Feb 22 at 8:36

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