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The Helpline was set up ten years ago by the Students Union and it aims to provide new students to the university with a service that they can use if they need information about practical areas of student life that they are unfamiliar with. I think It should be at. Or to in this context has another meaning. If it is, what it means. By the way,in this sentence *There's* tea and coffee facilities there which is spoken by a native speaker in an English test. I think it should be There are. Thank you so much!!

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In the 'aim to' construct the verb aim is intransitive, meaning that it does not require an object. Examples: I aim to shoot. You aim to succeed. He aims to grow a mustache.

In 'aim at' the verb is transitive and requires an object. Examples: I aim the gun at the dummy. You aim the telescope at the parking lot. They aim at losing weight.

Strictly speaking, you are right about the 'there are'. However, the English languange is somewhat complicated when it comes to 'is' or 'are' after 'there'. I found the following on dictionary.com under Usage Notes: If the noun closest to the 'there' is singular then the verb may be singular, too. For example, the sentence 'there is a frog and a fish in the pond' is acceptable. So if you assume that the tea stands on its own 'is' can be correct. However, if you say that the speaker means 'tea facilities and coffee facilities' then 'are' is correct. Note that the two sentences mean different things: 'There's tea and coffee facilities' means that there is tea and there are coffee facilities. 'There are tea and coffee facilities' means that there are tea facilities and there are coffee facilities.

  • I mean ''to'' after ''new students'' ''new students to the university''. I think it should be at the university. Anyway thank you so much!! – user337107 Feb 21 at 8:09
  • Although 'at' works, better is "new students of the university", or "students new to the university". – AmI Feb 21 at 10:23
  • Oops! I am sorry, I misunderstood you. Here is what I think explains the 'to' in 'new students to the university': According to the Merrian-Webster (merriam-webster.com/dictionary/to) item 4, the preposition to is used as a function word to indicate addition, attachment, connection, belonging, possession, accompaniment, or response. – Dax D. Feb 21 at 12:51
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The Helpline was set up ten years ago by the Students Union and it aims to provide new students to the university with a service that they can use if they need information about practical areas of student life that they are unfamiliar with.

This is an inversion and poorly written. You can rephrase it as follows:

The Helpline was set up ten years ago by the Students Union and it aims to provide students new to the university with a service that they can use if they need information about practical areas of student life that they are unfamiliar with.

"students new to the university" can be understood as "students who are new to the university"

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