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In the short sentence below should there be an apostrophe?

My Sisters protector.

closed as off-topic by sumelic, Mari-Lou A, Tonepoet, RegDwigнt Feb 16 at 20:05

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    @Lordology the user is new; give him a bit of time to get used to this and be a little more welcoming. – Mr Pie Feb 16 at 16:50
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    it's the internet, someone who's here to "uphold the rules and guidelines" should be a little bit more helpful next time and thank you @user you've been very helpful – john Feb 16 at 16:55
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    @user477343 It's fine, apologies if my comments came across as rude, and have a nice day. Issue resolved... Although, john, I humbly ask that you amend your mistakes to make this site a better place. Thanks. – Lordology Feb 16 at 16:59
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    Whether it needs an apostrophe depends on what you're trying to express. Please edit to explain what you're trying to express. For example, "auditors general" doesn't use an apostrophe if it's the plural of "auditor general", but it does if you're talking about the general (boss) of an auditor. – Lawrence Feb 16 at 17:02
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    @Lordology does have a point. The main reason he/she has flagged the question is so you could edit it and make the site look better. Hey, perhaps give some background info so we could answer your question better! (I will use the term "they" to refer to the gender of Lordology, hereafter.) Being flagged isn't too big of a deal, but only allows moderators to examine your question in particular, I believe. So, if you edit your question to meet with the criteria of this site, which I believe is reasonable, then the moderators won't put your question on hold or close it or anything :) – Mr Pie Feb 16 at 17:05
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In the short sentence "My Sisters protector." should there be an apostrophe?

The answer is yes.

However, there are two cases we must consider:

  • You have one sister; or

  • You have more than one sister.

In each of these cases, the apostrophe is positioned differently. Let's take a look at the first case (see what I did there? :P)

Case 1: You have one sister.

If you have one sister, then the apostrophe is placed before the last "s" of "Sisters". This is to say, the sentence should be written out as follows:

My sister's protector.

So the protector protects your one sister. (Note that I do not capitalise the first letter of the word "sister" unlike what you did, but your question is not about this in particular, though I do feel it is necessary to point this capitalisation out.)

Now, let's examine the second case:

Case 2: You have more than one sister.

If you have more than one sister, then the apostrophe is placed after the last "s" of "Sisters". This is to say, the sentence should be written out as follows:

My sisters' protector.

So the protector protects all your multiple sisters.

:)

  • But look at the capitalization. What if it's a singular proper name? Let's say it's the name of a restaurant. I like to eat at My Sisters downtown. It's still singular, but most style guides would still have you add only an apostrophe at the end because of how the final word is pronounced: Pizza is on the My Sisters' menu. Alternatively, it would be rephrased to avoid confusion: Pizza is on the menu at My Sisters. – Jason Bassford Feb 16 at 19:20

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