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What I am trying to express is that I have a problem P and a good G and it is easy to protect G from P. However, G is not the focus of the sentence and P was described in the previous sentence.

So I would like to say something like:

There is the additional problem P. However, it is easily protected against.

With it referring to the problem P and without going into what G is again. However, the construction seems complicated and possibly plain incorrect. What we would be a good expression?

I also considered:

There is the additional problem P. However, it is easy to protect against.

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  • You could switch to an it-cleft with non-referential it: 'There is the additional problem P. However, it is easy to protect against P.' Commented Feb 27, 2022 at 14:27

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It depends on the specific kind of problem P.

In general, stylists frown on the use of the passive tense, so I would advise against "it is easily protected against" on that ground (although that style guidance, like pretty much any style guidance, has become controversial, which is why it is called "guidance" instead of "a rule", so factor that into your decision).

With P being very vague, I could accept "it is easy to protect against" but I do not love it. In fact, I would perhaps go as far as changing the structure of the paragraph to avoid using that construction.

I also would prefer to chose a more specific verb than "protect" but which verb to use depends on the problem P.

If we overlook the fact that many of these example problems are not actually easily protected against, you could say

A terrorist threat is easily countered

The potential for rain is easily handled by having the event indoors

There is also a potential denial of service attack, but we can easily thwart that

We may face labor unrest, but we can easily quash any organized protest

We could face a lawsuit over trademark infringement, but we have adequate defenses against that

I prefer the above, but if you want to stick more closely to your original proposal, I would suggest:

There is the additional problem of terrorism. However, that threat is easily countered.

There is the additional problem of rain. However, that is easily handled by having the event indoors.

There is the additional problem of denial of service attacks. However, they can be easily thwarted.

There is the additional problem of labor unrest. However, we can easily quash any organized protest.

There is the additional problem of a lawsuit over trademark infringement. However, that is easily defended against.

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    I would never avoid a passive construction just because some misguided (and outdated) style guides advocate against it – it’s a myth that the passive voice should be avoided, and those who rail against it the loudest are frequently utterly incapable both of identifying a passive construction and subsequently also of following their own advice. Only avoid the passive if it sounds clunky or doesn’t fit, and even then only if an active construction fares better. (Your first two suggestions with different verbs, for instance, are in no way inferior to the rest.) Commented Jul 12, 2019 at 22:41
  • When one is IMMUNE to, one is protected against illness; FIRE-WALLED against in computing, etc.
    – Ram Pillai
    Commented Nov 10, 2019 at 1:37

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