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  1. The earlier the request is made, the higher the priority it will be given.

  2. The earlier the request is made, the higher priority it will be given.

Seems like 2 is more common than 1. I would like to have your opinions.

-2

Your second version is correct. You don't need "the" before the "priority".
You may find additional information here:
The…the… with comparative adjectives

But if the sentence refers to the specific priority the definite article is required there.

  • Hi, welcome to EL&U. Try to give a little more reasoning for your answer and even link to a helpful site touching on this subject, if needed. – A. Kvåle Feb 13 '19 at 7:42
  • No problem, it's hard for new contributors to know all the preferred aspects of an answer. – A. Kvåle Feb 13 '19 at 7:59
  • Funny that, Alex, I have exactly the opposite opinion. If the question said "If the request is made earlier it will be given higher priority" then the definite article is not required but as it is written the sentence refers to the specific priority which will be allocated, not an abstract quantity. Also I believe that your quoted source disagrees with you. – BoldBen Feb 13 '19 at 11:04
  • @BoldBen Thank you for your correction. You're right. If the sentence refers to the specific priority the definite article is required there. But this sentence is about request, not the priority. There's a pronoun "it" in the second part of the sentence and it's related to the request mentioned in the first part I believe. Anyway thank you. I've edited my answer. – Alex Kuchin Feb 14 '19 at 15:23

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