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How do you use 'Hope ' in a sentence where you want the person to know that someone is in hope that he would help him. Is this sentence correct- He is holding on hope against you.

Pls clarify. Thanks

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  • I'm afraid that I can't work out which person you are talking to. Could you give us a bit more information? A good idea might be to label one person A, the other B and rewrite the request using those labels. – BoldBen Feb 11 at 19:58
  • Thanks for responding. So, I am talking to person A and I want to tell person A that I think person B is having some hopes from him, ie person A. So would this sentence be right? -> He is holding on hope against you. Thanks – Ritz Feb 11 at 20:10
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It sounds like Person B has pinned her hopes on Person A.

  • I like that, "A, B has pinned her hopes on you, I hope you can help her." – BoldBen Feb 12 at 21:34
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How do you use 'Hope ' in a sentence where you want the person to know that someone is in hope that he would help him. Is this sentence correct- He is holding on hope against you.

hold out hope is an idiom: TFD

To maintain hope that something will happen or be the case, especially when it does not seem likely. Often used in negative constructions, and often used with modifiers like "much," "any," "little," etc., before the word "hope."

Your sentence grammatically would be:

He is holding out hope that you would help him.

  • Ok, so is this correct - he is holding out hope on you. – Ritz Feb 12 at 8:02
  • @Ritz No, "Holding out hope on" someone is just not colloquial English. "Holding out hope that" something will happen is as is "pinned her hope on you" as in Joshua Kaden's answer and my comment on it. I think you need to rework your sentence. – BoldBen Feb 12 at 21:36

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