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In the passage below, shouldn't the writer have included which is before the word championed, since it is in a non-defining clause?

In seeking to describe the origins of theater, one must rely primarily on speculation, since there is little concrete evidence on which to draw. The most widely accepted theory, championed by anthropologists in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, envisions theater as emerging out of myth and ritual. The process perceived by these anthropologists may be summarized briefly.

  • "championed by anthropologists in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries" appears between a pair of commas and is parenthetical. Everything else is quite simple. HTH. – Kris Feb 6 at 7:35
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No, a non-finite clause as well as a finite clause can be a supplementary clause (which is what you call 'a non-defining clause'). And if you're to use a finite clause there, it should be not which is but which was, because the supplementary clause is about the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

The most widely accepted theory, which was championed by anthropologists in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, envisions theater as emerging out of myth and ritual.

EDIT

Here are some of the many, many examples found in news articles and books:

Tyndall believed it was vital for improving human health that the germ theory, championed by people like Louis Pasteur and Joseph Lister, be shown to be true.

(From this Guardian article)

The other dominant theory, championed by anthropologist Donald Symons in his 1979 book The Evolution of Human Sexuality, holds that the female orgasm, like male nipples, evolved as a byproduct of natural selection.

(From this Quartz article)

The second major theory of our times is transformational leadership theory, championed by James McGregor Burns (2003), as well as by Bernard Bass and Bruce Avolio (1993).

(From the book What’s Wrong With Leadership?)

  • See my comment at OP. – Kris Feb 6 at 7:36
  • @Kris Saying that it "appears between a pair of commas and is parenthetical" is the same thing as saying that it's a supplementary clause. Then, why do you tell me to see your comment?? – JK2 Feb 6 at 8:32
  • Because that's a much simpler and straightforward way to look at it. – Kris Feb 6 at 8:43
  • @Kris How the mouthful, laymanish "appears between a pair of commas and is parenthetical" is much simpler and straightforward than the single, authentic term "supplementary"? – JK2 Feb 6 at 10:05
  • Thanks a lot, but some say that it's essential to include "which was" because it's in a non-defining clause, and it should not be omitted?? is that right? – Adam Jordan Feb 6 at 12:55

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