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  1. There is just one comment by Jim on Alan's question. Alan to Jim: Some comments are just irrelevant, like yours.

  2. There is more than one comment by Jim on Alan's question. Alan to Jim: Some comments are just irrelevant, like yours / like your ones

I have seen "yours" being used when referring to more than one, so I guess it is not incorrect. But isn't it more idiomatic, or more acceptable in academic texts, to use "your ones" instead?

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    No, "your ones" sounds strange and rather barbarous to me. I would never use it in any capacity, much less in an academic text – Robusto Feb 5 at 0:58
  • "Your ones" is not idiomatic English. Instead, one would be explicit: "... like [some/several/many/most/all] of yours." – remarkl Feb 5 at 0:59
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    Yours is a pronoun commonly used for both singular and plural subjects. There is nothing unidiomatic about it. – Jason Bassford Feb 5 at 5:10

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