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In the process of making a design, what is the design called? (Specifically in regard to graphic design)

As in:

Please see first design(??) of poster attached

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    We're really trying to avoid using this site for "single word requests" where a dictionary, thesaurus or reverse-dictionary lookup will suffice. If you have a particularly interesting problem to solve, all we ask is that you put a bit of effort and research into the question. See: meta.english.stackexchange.com/questions/1654/… or meta.english.stackexchange.com/questions/2160/… Nov 15, 2011 at 18:44
  • Sorry about that, I'm still learning my way around here :)
    – Chaim
    Nov 15, 2011 at 18:53
  • No problem. It's a legacy problem that we're just trying to understand and address positively. Nov 15, 2011 at 19:02
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    @RobertCartaino: Do you really think this particular question is solvable by a dictionary/thesaurus/reverse-dictionary? I don't think so.
    – Mitch
    Nov 15, 2011 at 20:03
  • @Mitch Please read the meta discussion here: meta.english.stackexchange.com/questions/2160/…. Do you think this meets the criteria outlined? Or do you disagree there is a quality problem at all? Nov 15, 2011 at 21:06

1 Answer 1

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If I understand your question, this is usually referred to as a comp:

In graphic design and advertising, a comprehensive layout or comprehensive, usually shortened to comp, is the page layout of a proposed design as initially presented by the designer to a client, showing the relative positions of text and illustrations before the specific content of those elements has been decided on, as a rough draft of the final layout in which to build around.

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  • Thanks, seems to be what I'm looking for! However, once you design a comp, what would you refer to it as as you make revisions until you have finalized it? A revision perhaps?
    – Chaim
    Nov 15, 2011 at 18:43
  • Design clients tend to be less technical, so version is normally preferred.
    – Gnawme
    Nov 15, 2011 at 23:35

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