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I have been provided with the following sentence by a native English speaker

Successful coalitions carefully choose the brands that they think are the best fit for their programme both in terms of value and benefit to their customers.

I am not a native English speaker so a bit hesitant to point out that the correct placement of the word "both" should be as below. Am I right?

Successful coalitions carefully choose the brands that they think are the best fit for their programme in terms of both value and benefit to their customers.

marked as duplicate by Community Jan 29 at 13:35

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It is good you didn't correct them as the sentence is correct.

Successful coalitions carefully choose the brands that they think are the best fit for their programme both in terms of value and benefit to their customers.

now why is it correct?

I don't know it just is! Hopefully somebody will know

  • As per (the answer to this question)[english.stackexchange.com/questions/377984/…, this is grammatically wrong. It is entirely possible that it is an acceptable way of speaking/writing. – Suhas Jan 29 at 12:47
  • this looks like splitting infinitives to me (i.e. not really cared about) – WendyG Jan 29 at 14:03

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