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As an active market participant for the past few years, I am amazed by how Algorithmic Trading has redefined the way trading is done and by the increasing number of asset managers that are adopting this technique. Not to mention the outstanding returns and ability to consistently outperform more traditional investment vehicles.

  • Is 'not to mention' ever used correctly? I mean, pretty much in every case, the thing that is supposedly not going to be mentioned follows immediately thereafter. – Ed Grimm Jan 29 at 1:24
  • @EdGrimm For me "not to mention" is short for "that is not to mention" where "that" refers to the previous statement (Statement A, say). This means that Statement A does not mention a point included in the second statement (Statement B, say). If "not to mention" were not shortened you would have sentences of the form "<Statement A>, that is not to mention <Statement B>". However we normally say "<Statement A>, not to mention <Statement B>". This is an opinion that I can't support from research so is presented as a comment, however it may help you to be comfortable with the construction.; – BoldBen Jan 29 at 12:02
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Your example (which is grammatically correct) modified in a different way:

As an active market participant for the past few years, I am amazed by how 'Algorithmic Trading' has redefined the way trading is done and by the increasing number of asset managers that are adopting this technique, not to mention the outstanding returns and ability to consistently outperform more traditional investment vehicles.

A longer sentence, but not a run-on. Including not to mention at the ending parts of a sentence emphasizes its use as a rhetorical device.

From the OED:

not to mention ——: used to refer to an additional fact or point which reinforces the speaker's case (a rhetorical device suggesting that the full strength of the speaker's argument is not being presented).

Another example:

Tempting, but wrong: The Democratic base, not to mention the large majority of Americans is not nearly as partisan as the loudest voices on Twitter or cable news. Slate Jan 27, 2019

  • Thanks for your reply, I was worried about the sentence length when I first wrote the paragraph since I didn´t want to lose the reader attention. Yet, I do find appealing the emphasis that not to mention provides to the entire sentence. – Luis Jan 29 at 0:19
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Not to mention shouldn't start a sentence, at least not when wriitng. They are always used in the middle of sentences, to add on to other sentences.

See these examples:

https://www.wordhippo.com/what-is/sentences-with-the-word/not_to_mention.html

A better way to write the second sentence might be:

In addition, I am amazed by its the outstanding returns and ability to consistently outperform more traditional investment vehicles.

Hope this helps.

  • Oh, you can start a sentence with it. It's a colloquial construction, after all, and starting a sentence with it happens in real life, as an afterthought. The rules for formal writing don't apply outside the classroom; mostly people just talk. – John Lawler Jan 28 at 23:58
  • Thank you for your quick responses! I really appreciate it. As I understand it would not be correct if I use "Not to mention" at the beginning of a sentence when writing an academic paper? – Luis Jan 29 at 0:08
  • @Luis this answer is incorrect. It appears to be based on a single website result, which is simply a list of examples. Not to mention, there's no link provided to the supposed "rule" [note my correct use of the expression to start this sentence!]. Also, the proposed "better way" to write the sentence has an obvious error. – Chappo Says Reinstate Monica Jan 30 at 4:51

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