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I was wondering if these two sentences had a different meaning.

1) He came into power when his father, Gerald, was exiled to Europe during World War II.

2) He came into power when his father, Gerald, exiled to Europe during World War II.

  • The second sentence is ungrammatical, so it really has no meaning at all. Exile, as a verb, is a transitive—you have to exile someone. You can't just say he exiled. – Jason Bassford Supports Monica Jan 28 '19 at 2:47
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'Exile is a transitive verb. It takes a subject and object. So we say 'Alice exiled Bob', meaning that Alice threw Bob out if the country.

We can also use the passive voice 'Bob was exiled by Alice' which means the same thing.' (omitting '...by Alice' if we don't care about who did it to him). This is the form most normally used.

So option 1 is probably right. In option 2 the verb 'Exile' needs an object to tell us who Gerald sent to Europe.

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