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I used "lay easy on someone" today, to mean "go easy on someone" (when we learned the person is going through a hard time). I strongly feel people use this phrase (English is my second language), but I can't find anything about it on Google. Is it a real phrase?

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  • Not in American English (I can't speak for British usage). But in American English we do have a phrase, "lay off of someone" to mean going easy on the person. If spoken at the moment when the harsh treatment is happening, it's often shortened to just, "Lay off!" – JDM-GBG Jan 26 at 13:56
  • We could also say something (a potentially disturbing act or idea, for example) sits easy on [someone who has no qualms about it]. But I think the preposition on there is extremely dated, if not archaic - today, we'd usually use with. – FumbleFingers Jan 26 at 14:10
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I used lay easy on someone" today, to mean "go easy on someone" (when we learned the person is going through a hard time).

Lay easy is slang and does not covey the sense you desire.

Better:

  • Go easy on X. (when we learned the person is going through a hard time).
  • Lay off X.
  • Ease up on X.

Green’s Dictionary of Slang provides the following:

lay-easy

sexually available or compliant

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