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When I talk to someone and I want to finish the conversation and say that I am heading out to the store right now, should I use "I'm going to go to the store" or "I'm going to the store". Is there a difference?

What about when I am on the phone? What if I am in chat? Would it be clear to the person (if he can't see what I am doing) that I am leaving now and not on my way already?

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    Why not say, “I’m headed out to the store right now” if that’s what you mean? – Jim Jan 25 '19 at 13:24
  • Both can mean it's happening immediately. But both can also mean that it's going to happen some time from now. There is no inherent semantic difference between the two constructions. – Jason Bassford Jan 25 '19 at 19:09
  • @JasonBassford that is what I wanted to find out, thank you. Perhaps I could have worded my question better – Jody Raven Jan 28 '19 at 7:20
  • @Jason is only partially correct. Both of those can be said in either case, but "I'm going to the store" usually means right now, while "I'm going to go the store" usually means sometime further in the future from right now. If someone said the latter to me, I might well ask "When are you leaving?" – Robusto Oct 22 '19 at 13:18
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"I'm going to go to the store" = I will go to the store in the future; I am not leaving now. It would normally be followed by a time, e.g. "tomorrow".

"I'm going to the store" could be something I am currently doing, about to do, or will do in the future. It's not idiomatic at all for "currently", and it would normally be followed by a time: "now" or "tomorrow" for example.

Idiomatically, if I wanted to tell someone I was currently going to the store, I wouldn't use the verb "to go". So I might say "I'm en route to the store".

Idiomatically, if I wanted to tell someone I was about to leave for the store, I'd say "I'm off to the store."


All this is the highly subjective opinion of a native British English speaker (me). And, to be honest, if I'm talking idiomatic British English I wouldn't use the word "store", I'd talk about a "shop".

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  • I'm "en route"? Really? Isn't this French? – V. Courtois Nov 21 '19 at 14:45
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    @V.Courtois - Mais oui, bien sur. It's also been adopted into the English language. Just as "email" and "le weekend" have been adopted into French from English. – AndyT Nov 21 '19 at 14:55
  • I didn't know frenchisms were that frequent in English. But I can testify the diversity of commonly accepted foreign languages' words in French :) – V. Courtois Nov 21 '19 at 15:05
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    @V.Courtois - There are quite a few French phrases adopted into English. See e.g. wikipedia's list, although note that they're not all common. – AndyT Nov 21 '19 at 15:09
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You should and could say any of the following: "I'm going to the store"
"I need to go to the store"
"I need to go to the store right now"

If you are on your way (walking right now to the store, as you speak) you can say "I'm going to the store right now".

"I'm gonna go the store" is 100% grammatically incorrect, even ignoring the colloquial 'gonna'. If you wanted to use 'gonna' to replace 'going to', you have to add the preposition 'to':
"I'm gonna go TO the store" because you are going TO a place.

A little more detail:
"I'm going to the store" is simply saying just that. There are no specific mentions of time. If you were leaving right now, you can say "I'm going to the store. [the 'right now' is implied] Do you want me to get you anything?" You can also say, "I'm going to the store TODAY/TOMORROW/NEXT WEEK".

"I need to go to the store" is saying that you have a need, a requirement, there is a place you must be. If you wanted to make it even more urgent, you can say:

"I need to go to the store right now" [and that I must hang up]. For example, "I need to go to the toilet." is saying you have an unmet need, that you have to go to the toilet at some point. But if you said "I need to go to the toilet right now.", it means this very moment, is urgent and cannot hold it.

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  • Sorry, I have made a typo. My question is whether there is a difference between “I'm going to go to the store” and “I'm going to the store”. Would it be clear to the person (especially if he can't see what I am doing) that I am leaving now and not on my way already? – Jody Raven Jan 25 '19 at 11:34

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