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I have recently read the following sentence

Would have to collect it until Saturday

When I asked the author what they meant, they stated it is the same as

Would have to collect it on Saturday

For me, this hurts my head and doesn't make sense.

The person could have written

Would be available to collect until Saturday
Would have to collect it before Saturday
Would have to collect it after Saturday
Would have to collect it on Saturday

We then asked some one else who also seemed to think it was good English but we all have doubts.

Is it grammatically correct to use the word until in this way?

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Would have to collect it until Saturday

This is not a grammatical sentence in English. The verb requires a subject:

She would have to collect it until Saturday.

The object, "it", could be something such as the mail, or the rubbish:

She would have to collect the mail until Saturday.

Even then, this sentence is not good idiomatic English. It would require an adverb/adverbial phrase:

She would have to collect the mail every day until Saturday.

If the writer meant:

She would have to collect it on Saturday.

Then that is the only correct way to say it (unless they are in the USA, in which case they could say: She would have to collect it Saturday.)

Using would makes it sound like a conversation about a possible future event. If this is not a hypothetical conversation, then it is better to use will:

She will have to collect it on Saturday.

If it will not be available after Saturday, then the writer could have written:

It will be available to collect until Saturday.

She will have to collect it by Saturday.

Although, I suspect the writer is trying to say that it will not be available for collection until Saturday, in which case the following are correct:

She will not be able to collect it until Saturday.

She will be able to collect it from Saturday onwards.

It will be available to be collected from Saturday.

It will be available for collection from Saturday.

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I also think this is bad English I have no idea what it means I THINK they meant to say

Have until Sunday to collect it

but unless today is Friday their own rewording makes no sense.

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"until" denotes something being the case up to some point. "collect until Saturday" means that the collection is continuously or repetitively occurring, up until Saturday. So, for instance, if you are at a beach, and you are continuously engaged in the process of collecting seashells, and you stop on Saturday, then it would be correct to say that you "collected seashells until Saturday".

There is the further complication as to whether one reads it as "Would have to (collect it until Saturday)" or "(Would have to collect it) until Saturday". That is, it can be read as "continuously collecting it is something that one would have to do until Saturday", or "having to collect is something that will be the case until Saturday".

It's not exactly true to say that the phrase is "ungrammatical", but rather it is quite unclear, and almost certainly is not expressing the meaning that the writer intends. It definitely does not mean the same as "Would have to collect it on Saturday".

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