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I have one confusion on the following paragraph: "At one level, my Grandma Frieda's college records are utterly ordinary-- don't tell much of a story. She's a good student, and teachers say the nice things that they say about bright students. " Here, what is the phrase "don't tell much of a story" in the context mean? What is the role it plays in the first sentence? My understanding is that it links the reverse meanings between the first sentence and the second one. But I am not able to know the its exact meaning. Hope you guys could help me out. Thanks a lot!

regards

Xiangyi

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  • What reverse meanings do you mean? The college records not telling much of a story is not the reverse of the college records being utterly ordinary – it’s a reiteration of their ordinariness. Jan 20, 2019 at 19:47

2 Answers 2

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From the idiom: be not much of a (something) TFD

to be particularly unimpressive in some capacity.

As in be not much of a story:

"At one level, my Grandma Frieda's college records are utterly ordinary-- don't tell much of a story.

would be interpreted:

"Grandma Frieda's college records are ordinary, unimpressive and of no particular note."

Her record does not stand out when compared to the many. Hers is rather mundane.

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The phrase is missing the word "they" -- the records don't tell much of a story. With "they" before "don't," the meaning is clear.

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