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This question already has an answer here:

In these sentences:

"Some (composes/compose) delightful music"
"Some of them (write/writes) wonderful books"

Which form of the verb should I use?

marked as duplicate by Mari-Lou A, choster, GEdgar, Edwin Ashworth, Cascabel Jun 18 at 20:24

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The subject’s premodifier does not change the grammatical number of that subject for purposes of verb agreement.

Because poets is plural, all of these take a plural verb:

  • Poets write sonnets.
  • Some poets write sonnets.
  • Some of the poets write sonnets.
  • Most poets write sonnets.
  • Most of the poets write sonnets.
  • Many poets write sonnets.
  • Many of the poets write sonnets.
  • Lots of poets write sonnets.
  • A lot of poets write sonnets.
  • No poets write sonnets.
  • None of the poets write sonnets.

But because rice is singular, all of these take a singular verb:

  • Rice is good for you.
  • Some rice is good for you.
  • Some of the rice is good for you.
  • Most rice is good for you.
  • Most of the rice is good for you.
  • Much rice is good for you.
  • Much of the rice is good for you.
  • Lots of rice is good for you.
  • A lot of rice is good for you.
  • No rice is good for you.
  • None of the rice is good for you.

As you see, the premodifier does not affect subject–verb agreement.

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