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Free press was eliminated ensuring that nothing negative about the Nazis could be published.

Free press was eliminated , ensuring that nothing negative about the Nazis could be published.

Now, from what I know, I would leave a comma in the second example, but would I be able to omit it and why?

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    The sentence is understandable without the comma, but much easier to understand with it. – Kate Bunting Jan 12 at 9:34
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Commas sometimes perform a critical function in determining what the writer means by what they have written. But sometimes commas are there to indicate that if the words were spoken with the intended meaning then there would be a pause at that point. In such cases, omitting the comma does not actually change the meaning but might mislead the reader, for a moment, in trying to understand what the writer intended.

In this case, any native speaker of English would certainly pause after the word 'eliminated'. It is therefore helpful to the reader to insert a comma after that word.

No comma would be needed if the sentence was slightly reworded: '...eliminated to ensure that nothing...', because in that case there would be no pause in the spoken sentence after 'eliminated'.

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