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In California, wildfires are raging again and strong winds and dry forests mean that the flames spread over 177 kilometres and destroy thousands of buildings.

I don't understand why 'mean' is put there.
Does 'mean' contain the meaning of like 'result'?
If so, Why did it use present tense, 'mean' instead of past tense 'meant'?

closed as off-topic by lbf, Cascabel, jimm101, Mark Beadles, J. Taylor Jan 17 at 0:02

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It's in the present tense because the whole sentence is in the present tense: "...are raging... mean ... spread [are spreading]... destroy [{are} destroying]..."

" Mean" is used because the strong winds and dry forests are having a direct effect on how quickly the fires are spreading.

You could replace "mean that" with "are causing":

In California, wildfires are raging again and strong winds and dry forests are causing the flames to spread over 177 kilometres and destroy thousands of buildings.

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