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The title kind of says it all.

I'm looking for the opposite of "it enables the customer to perform …". First thought was "it disables the customer to perform … " but that just doesn't sound right.

Looking at https://www.thesaurus.com/browse/disable but English not being my native language, I honestly have no idea what the most appropriate synonym would be.

closed as off-topic by Mark Beadles, Dan Bron, Robusto, lbf, tmgr Jan 11 at 0:10

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  • Grab a thesaurus and open it up at disable. Start your hunt there. – Dan Bron Jan 10 at 20:28
  • Start by defining what you understand enable to mean. I have a specific word in mind for the opposite—but how I understand enable may be different from how you understand it. – Jason Bassford Supports Monica Jan 10 at 20:57
  • I don't know what the most appropriate synonym would be either. Please provide an example of how you would use this word in context. – michael.hor257k Jan 10 at 21:07
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I'd go with simplicity and clarity: prevent.

"It prevents the client from"

It's also relatively natural language, but works in a technical context also: disallow may theoretically work, but sounds so stiff that its use is likely to impact readability.

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I think disallow would be appropriate here, meaning "does not allow" (https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/disallow)

"it disallows the customer to perform …"

If you can change the wording of the rest of the sentence, then prevents would work, meaning "to keep from happening" (https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/prevent)

"it prevents the customer from performing …"

  • Are you sure it's "disallows the customer to perform" and not "disallows the customer from performing"? The latter sounds better to me, but I haven't been able to find many usage examples either way. – Tanner Swett Jan 10 at 22:11

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