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Which would be correct

Let’s look at your final scorecard, General Ignorance.

Let’s look at your final scorecard: General Ignorance.

And can you cite why your response is correct? Thank you

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Either one can be correct, depending on what you mean. Are you addressing General Ignorance, or are you going to look at a scorecard that says "General Ignorance?"

Comma

Let's look at your final scorecard, General Ignorance.

One function of a comma is to specify someone in a direct address. Number 10 in this list of comma uses from Business Insider gives this helpful example:

"Stop clubbing, baby seals."

Those baby seals need to stop going to clubs. Similarly, I read your example as if you're talking to someone named General Ignorance.

Colon

Let’s look at your final scorecard: General Ignorance.

Here, a colon follows a complete clause with another statement providing emphasis. Here's an example from the Punctuation Guide:

After three weeks of deliberation, the jury finally reached a verdict: guilty.

The word or phrase following the colon emphasizes the verdict that was reached. Similarly, you seem to be emphasizing that someone received a final scorecard of "General Ignorance."

Your colon example may need an additional change because it isn't quite proportional: an entire scorecard is not the same as a single score. Look at this example from the UNC Writing Center:

My roommate gave me the things I needed most: companionship and quiet.

"Companionship and quiet" directly corresponds to "the things I needed most," just as "guilty" is "a verdict." However, the main connection between "General Ignorance" and "your final scorecard" isn't correspondence (General Ignorance isn't a kind of scorecard) but a kind of quotation: General Ignorance is what the scorecard says, not what it is. So I would expect it to be in quotes at minimum:

Let's look at your final scorecard: "General Ignorance."

Starting a new clause or sentence would also help clarify what you mean:

Let's look at your final scorecard. It says, "General Ignorance."

Notice that in this new clause, I use a comma to start the quote. This is according to conventions for quotation. I would use a colon if the utterance introducing the quote is a sentence.

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    "General Ignorance, you're here!" "Ah, Captain Obvious, how good of you to notice." – Juhasz Jan 8 at 21:49

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